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08 The Movie

“I do not seek applause, nor to amuse the people, I want to convince them.” —Abraham Lincoln

The telegraph office scene in the movie appears to be a result of Abraham Lincoln and the Structure of Reason. Our books are the first to demonstrate the use of the six elements of a proposition by Lincoln or any other President. The Lincoln impersonator below, David Hirsch, is one of the two authors.






“I do not seek applause, nor to amuse the people, I want to convince them.” —Abraham Lincoln

David Hirsch and Dan Van Haften AUTHOR'S VOICE® The Ultimate Guide to the Gettysburg Address

“I do not seek applause, nor to amuse the people, I want to convince them.” —Abraham Lincoln

The telegraph office scene in the movie appears to be a result of Abraham Lincoln and the Structure of Reason. Our books are the first to demonstrate the use of the six elements of a proposition by Lincoln or any other President. The Lincoln impersonator below, Dan Van Haften, is one of the two authors.




On the left, in a dimly lit room, "Lincoln" talks to two telegraph  operators. Lincoln makes a triangle with his fingers. This is a physical reference to Euclid's Proposition 1, a demonstration to construct an equilateral triangle. 
Proposition 1 was composed according to the six elements of a proposition. This is the same structure Abraham Lincoln used for his most famous speeches.

The picture on the left is from the Steven Spielberg movie "Lincoln" Click in the Lincoln picture on the left to enlarge it and see Lincoln's triangle.

Click here for a short excerpt from the Spielberg movie Lincoln website. It directly references Euclid.
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